Home Newsroom Dogood Institute Congratulations to the 2018 Do Good Medallion Recipients

Congratulations to the 2018 Do Good Medallion Recipients

The University of Maryland class of 2018 is full of bold thinkers, philanthropists, change makers, entrepreneurs, advocators, researchers and social innovators. From climate change to public health, from cybersecurity to access to education, from hunger to human rights, Terps across campus are committed to doing good on campus, in their communities, state and world.

The Do Good Institute is honored to announce 32 students received the first-ever Do Good Medallion for their extraordinary commitment to social impact and innovation and their efforts to transform the University of Maryland into the nation's first Do Good Campus. These 32 students were selected from nearly 1,000 for their participation - and placement as a semi-finalist or finalist - in the annual Do Good Challenge

“We are proud of the passion and commitment that University of Maryland students have shown to make meaningful changes and profound impact for some of our world’s most pressing social issues,” said Bob Grimm, director of the Do Good Institute. “With the Do Good Campus, we’re working to engage every student with experiences from orientation to graduation to inspire every Terp to make an impact for a cause they care about during their time at Maryland.”

These graduates represent seven colleges and schools at University of Maryland, including A. James Clark School of Engineering, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, College of Arts and Humanities, College of Behavioral and Social Sciences, College of Computer, Mathematical and Natural Sciences, Robert H. Smith School of Business, and School of Public Health.

The Do Good Institute offers its congratulations to the following graduates:

  • Lumnwi Audrey Awasom, Robert H. Smith School of Business
  • Bianca Fiore, School of Public Health
  • Samantha Francis, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources
  • Emily Goo, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources
  • Becky Goodridge, College of Behavioral and Social Sciences
  • Nishka Hatten, A. James Clark School of Engineering
  • Jennifer Holler, College of Computer, Mathematical and Natural Sciences
  • Matthew Hollister, College of Computer, Mathematical and Natural Sciences
  • Samrat Jha, A. James Clark School of Engineering
  • Cristina Johnson, Phillip Merrill College of Journalism
  • Kimberly Johnson, Robert H. Smith School of Business
  • Mandela Jones, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources
  • Daniel Katz, Robert H. Smith School of Business
  • Tais Krylova, Robert H. Smith School of Business
  • Matthew Lagomarsino, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources
  • Erich Meissner, A. James Clark School of Engineering
  • Nebafabs Cedric Nwafor, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources
  • Tolu Obalade, College of Behavioral and Social Sciences
  • Orukanma Okogbule-Wonodi, Robert H. Smith School of Business
  • Sabrina Pasta, School of Public Health
  • Tommy Piantone, Robert H. Smith School of Business
  • Julia Pennington, College of Computer, Mathematical and Natural Sciences
  • Anabel Reynolds, School of Public Health
  • Daniel Rosenberry, A. James Clark School of Engineering
  • Alyssa Schledwitz, College of Computer, Mathematical and Natural Sciences
  • Miriam Tasker, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources
  • Sarah Taylor, A. James Clark School of Engineering
  • Autumn Thompson, College of Arts and Humanities
  • Gillian Vesely, Phillip Merrill College of Journalism
  • Alex Wilson, School of Public Health
  • Nikki Wolfrey, College of Behavioral and Social Sciences